Cycling Slow, Knitting Better

2012-03-28Kickstand.gif

Source: www.yehudamoon.comYesterday Pamela drove over to the Valley to see family and a friend early in the morning. I was registered for the Finished Knitting class at Have A Yarn taught by Angela which started in the afternoon. Instead of riding with Pamela and waiting around the Tim Hortons until The Biscuit Eater opened, I decided to ride the bike over. I have not ridden the rails-to-trail path from Lunenburg to Mahone Bay and cyclists told me at the Fibre Retreat that the four-wheelers had torn up the path north of Oak Island, so I was hesitant.

Rode into town first to get some cash from the ATM and warm up the legs, though at my current lack of conditioning, a warm up is more a wear out.

View Larger Map

Lunenburg to Mahone Bay

Ride Time: 59:16

Stopped Time: 10:1

Distance: 12.96 km

Average Speed: 13.12 km/h

Fastest Speed: 44.87 km/h

Ascent: 105 meters

Descent: 104 meters

Calories: 580

The path was in fairly good condition. The grassy parts were harder to ride on and the ruts from the four-wheelers were only slightly wet. I stopped several time to enjoy the views (code for take a break, drink water, strip off outer layers). And though the breaks were to rest, I forgot to take any photos. I am especially disappointed not to have photos of the lovely marsh area about half way down the path. I will make the ride again soon and remember to take photos this time (will be a good excuse for a break).

I am out of shape and the weakness in my legs will attest to that fact along with my slow average speed. I am testing several of the iPhone bike apps and though Strava has the nicest share feature, the data is more accurate in Cyclemeter because they account for stopped time. UPDATE: After talking with support I will continue with Cyclemeter because its give more information and better control.

Stopped into the Biscuit Eater for a cup of Ginger Tea and a Biscuit (that killed the 580 calories I had burned on the ride). Elly Danica surprised me with a gift of caps to cover my DPNs. I saw hers and wanted to make a set for myself, which I did. I liked her’s more because they fit better and looked nicer, form is as important as function (that is one reason I am an Apple fan). Later that evening I made a set for my needles. Thanks Elly.

IMG_0063.jpg

Quickly finished my tea and headed to Have A Yarn for a workshop with Angela on Finishing Your Knitting. Six of us spent the next four hours learning new methods of binding off, seaming, blocking, and generally improving our finished projects. The weather was turning nasty by the end of the workshop and Pamela offered to pick me up on her way home. Peddled over to Tim Hortons for a hot chocolate and worked on my socks which are coming along nicely.

IMG_0062.jpg

We decided to stop by The Knot Pub for an “Easter Dinner” and sat with Saundra and Rick and enjoyed a few beers, good conversation, and great pub food.

Waypoint Halifax

August 10, 2010 Halifax, NS

I hoped we could explore the Canadian School of Lutherie with George Ryzsani, builder of Voyageur, a Six String Nation guitar built from 63 pieces of  Canadian wood "representing many different cultures, communities and characters from all across the country", "including a piece of decking from the Bluenosoe II, a piece of Wayne Gretzky's hockey stick and wood from Pier 21". One of goals for the Six String Nation project is "to tell the story of a country from the roots to the trunk rather than the other way around; and to encourage us to tell that story to ourselves and the world through music".

George ran luthier workshops at the Canadian School of Lutherie, a centre for studying guitar building that specializes in building hand-made, custom guitars. He has made guitars for James Taylor, Keith Richards, Sting, Peter Gabriel and more. However, George is on his last guitar building project for the centre and will retire from his line of guitars. I believe his last is the only with a built in vile of ashes--the ashes of a beloved friend and musician. The upright guitar on the far right:

George put me in touch with Jeremy. Jeremy et al were fine hosts, happy to explain their projects and processes, answer all of our questions, and allow Jay to try out their wares.

Project central:

The Faireses left feeling like they could finally tackle the guitar kit they have back home.

We left the school for waterfront Halifax and found a Buskers Festival we didn't expect. Normally, the waterfront makes for nice strolling grounds peppered with the occasional musician or painter, but festival goers crowded the wharfs.

We watched boats cruise by in the harbour and wandered the wharf for a bit.

We found some local music, but, tired of crowds, we broke away for a seat and a drink ...

at The Old Triangle, one of several great pubs in Halifax.

Jay had another chance to say goodbye to Carmel Mikol; she was just outside on the pub patio.

We had been working up to dinner since morning, when we decided we wanted good Indian food for supper. The private circle room was a perfect fit at Taj Mahal, open just two days following a six-month closure due to fire:

We feasted and waddled away.

Of course, we could spend a week or more in the city, but with just one night's stay we had time for just a few highlights.

We also highly recommend the maritime museum, Neptune Theatre, Paper Chase cafe, The Wooden Monkey restaurant, Opa! restaurant, Maxwell's Plum English pub, Pogue Fado pub, Split Crow pub, The Economy Shoe Shop cafe/bar and any live music you can find.

-P

Bottoms Up

October 30, 2009 I first "met" Michael Mason, a naval architect, on the Woodenboat.com forum. No, we have no plans to build a boat (But did you know we considered living aboard before the whole bus thing?). The "hero" of my latest screenplay is a schooner builder and though I'm from Nova Scotia, I knew very little of the intricacies and art of boatbuilding, and what I did learn … Aye, I've got it forgot. ;)

So I cast a line. The bait: a dryfoot's sailing and boatbuilding questions from the keel up. The forumites have proven most receptive and they are my best resource for all things boating. They have woodenboat lust and they have brine in their veins. I think we have that in common since I go into withdrawal when away from the water for any length of time; three months in the desert tested all my cells, my moisturizing routine (I woke with a facelift every day courtesy of the wicking air), my hair-cum-straw, my sinuses...

Anyway. The forumites patiently give way to the newbie and Michael is probably one the most patient, candid and affable guys on the forum.

We enjoyed a few pints and a lively evening of conversation with him and his equally affable wife at The Knot pub in Lunenburg. Michael charmed us with his wit, gave us a few lessons (complete with napkin illustrations) and spun yarns above the bright rumble of chatty locals and music.

Michael, may your beer be the only thing bottoms up on the sea.

-P

Bottoms Up

October 30, 2009 I first "met" Michael Mason, a naval architect, on the Woodenboat.com forum. No, we have no plans to build a boat (But did you know we considered living aboard before the whole bus thing?). The "hero" of my latest screenplay is a schooner builder and though I'm from Nova Scotia, I knew very little of the intricacies and art of boatbuilding, and what I did learn … Aye, I've got it forgot. ;)

So I cast a line. The bait: a dryfoot's sailing and boatbuilding questions from the keel up. The forumites have proven most receptive and they are my best resource for all things boating. They have woodenboat lust and they have brine in their veins. I think we have that in common since I go into withdrawal when away from the water for any length of time; three months in the desert tested all my cells, my moisturizing routine (I woke with a facelift every day courtesy of the wicking air), my hair-cum-straw, my sinuses...

Anyway. The forumites patiently give way to the newbie and Michael is probably one the most patient, candid and affable guys on the forum.

We enjoyed a few pints and a lively evening of conversation with him and his equally affable wife at The Knot pub in Lunenburg. Michael charmed us with his wit, gave us a few lessons (complete with napkin illustrations) and spun yarns above the bright rumble of chatty locals and music.

Michael, may your beer be the only thing bottoms up on the sea.

-P