Self-Imposed Sabbatical

Eighteen months ago we moved back to Mahone Bay to live in a small house in town. For the first time in our eleven year relationship, Pamela was busy outside the house, teaching dance and organizing a theatre company and a new documentary festival in Lunenburg. For most of our relationship we have lived, worked, played, and traveled together every day. With Pamela out most of each week I spent my time in solitude and silence, and grew to enjoy this time of retreat. An occasional walk to the Biscuit Eater for society was enough. I began jogging earlier in the year while living in Blue Rocks and this solitary pursuit gave me much time for reflection. As the metronome played through my headset to guide my pace while running, my mind was free to wander around the chambers of my memory palace. Soon the routine divided the days into separate activities like a monk’s Hours or the sailor’s bells: run, bath, eat, sit in meditation, write, work, lunch, read, write, walk, dinner, eat, movie, read, sleep, and repeat.

In 2013 I ran almost 900km (5k, 10k, and half marathon) and it stopped almost as quickly as it started. Like many things im my life, the interest faded after having been an obsession for a period. The first six months in Mahone Bay changed me and I drew away from others and activities, closed down my website to a landing page and contact form, cancelled all social media, including Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and stepped out of all orgainzations and activites to focus on an essential few and my self-imposed sabbatical.

Reading, once again became a joyful expectation, as I re-read many treasured volumes from Márquez, McEwan, McCarthy, Maclean, Banville, Irving. O’Brian, Cather, Fraizer, Erdich, Robinson, and Booth, in addition to new discoveries like Richardson, Morgenstern, Sjon, and DeWitt. Poetry was an easy carry on a walk, so Basho, Thurston, Cooper, Oliver, Gluck, and Leslie accompanied me in my wanderings. A class at the Senior College of Nova Scotia (SCANS) reinvigored my interest in Shakespeare. The dance of words, well placed upon the page, captured my imagination and was only surpassed by images simply expressed in line and color. From Rembrant’s drawing to Peter Scully’s urban sketches, they capture a moment that, unlike a photograph, suspends the image into still life. A drawing embraces a decisive moment but also draws you in from a recent past and carries you forward a step into the future. Like a tarot card that looks back to the image on the left and forward to the other on the right, art allows the imagination to steer its own course rather then a specific path set down by the narrative pen.

Meditation calmed the raging torrent within me, as a mind on fire began to cool in the calmer waters of a tidal pool. Without distraction or excuse, I had to take responsibily for the consequences of my life. As Byron Katie says, what is, is. Gratitude was easier than contentment, for the latter seemed like giving into resolution and giving up on desire. And I was all about desire. Want it, get it, that was my credo. What the mind can conceive and believe it can achieve. But should it? I can conceive and believe in a lot of things that I really do not need or want in hindsight. So a reexamination was required. How simply one can live lead to a purge of books, clothes, and things. Not everything, there is still way too much stuff in my life. Some is sentimental, some involved too great an investment to just pass on casually. Is the question really, how simply can one live? Some may say yes, but there is a gnawing (that may be the problem, what is is) at the back of my head that wonders whether there is another question that needs answering. Then I sit and realize there is no question that needs to be answered. Only to live and experience life in kindness and gratitude. Now I am back to taking responsibilty for my life. Kindness eliminated the problem with contentment and I have much to make me grateful.

Call for Submissions

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Call for Submissions

10-Minute Plays 

2013 Evening of Short Plays

Our next production will run in mid to late August, 2013 (final dates to be announced), and we have openings for four, ten-minute plays (ten pages in standard play format) which will be selected based on a blind adjudication.

Our motif for the 2013 production is "Two Chairs". Each play must incorporate two chairs and only the two chairs are permitted as props, aside from accessories and costuming.

Please refer to the following link for an example of standard play format: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/ writersroom/scripts/stageus.pdf

To bind your submission, include a detached title page with your name, contact information and play

title and staple the remaining play pages together, ensuring that the title appears on the first page of the play. One submission per playwright.

Each winner is responsible for the production of their play, including casting, costuming and directing.

Attendance at It's Alive Playwrights Meetings is mandatory, including the introductory meeting on January 20th at 7pm.

Our four winners will be announced in January 2013.

Deadline: Postmarked by December 28, 2012

Act Now: First 25 submissions considered

Mail to: Box 404, Lunenburg, NS B0J 2C0

Questions: Email novapamela3@mac.com

Three Nights of Magic

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(scene from “Old Fools” with actors Jon Allen and Chris Anderson, sorry for poor quality of image)

Three nights of magic in the imaginary world of the theatre ended last night with another standing ovation. It’s Alive Theatre Company concluded it’s first production of An Evening of Short Plays with three sold out nights of performances. I find it difficult to express all my feelings, so I will just recap the highlights. I am overwhelmed by the talent of our cast of actors, who gave so much time to rehearsals and magically transformed a bare stage with only a few props into sets and scenes. I am amazed by the talents and skills of our stage manager and crew who choreographed the set changes and made sets appear as a dance. I am grateful for our MC, who brought energy and enthusiasm for the project and broadcast it through interviews and live during each evening. I am humbled by the talent of my fellow writers, who created works of imagination and brought them to life on the stage. They inspire me to continue creating. I am thankful for you, my friends and neighbors, who stepped out of their normal lives for an evening and joined and encouraged us by your attendance and ovations. I am happy for the support of our local community and the sponsors who stepped up to fund our experiment before it was proven a success. I am hopeful for the future because of the requests we are already receiving from others who want to sponsor our upcoming productions.

Thank you All:

ACTORS

Jon Allen, Chris Anderson, Pierre Bachand, Mark Cruickshank, Dan Jaworski, 

Bruce Jollymore

, Jullie Knowles, 

Pamela Segger

, Shannon Sponagle, Saundra Vernon, and Cynthia Walker.

STAGE MANAGER

Liesha Wagner Letson

STAGEHANDS

Shannon Campbell

 and Michelle Graves

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Nancy Wilson

MUSICIAN

Gus Web

GUEST DIRECTORS

Merrill Heubach, Alistair Jarvis

WRITERS

Susan Cruckshank, Rick Myers, Pamela Segger, 

Alison Smith

, and Lloyd Williams

New Theatre Company in Lunenburg

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Five local South Shore playwrights started It’s Alive Theatre Company in Lunenburg to highlight local writers and actors in original plays.

Our first production, An Evening of Short Plays will be October 11–13th at the Lunenburg Cultural Centre.

We hope you will join us for an evening of great entertainment.

Details

Event: An Evening of Short Plays

Date: October 11, 12, 13

Time: 7:30 pm

Place: The Lunenburg Cultural Centre, 114 Fox Street

Cost: $10 (great deal for an evening of entertainment)

Includes: Live music, six short plays (two dramas, two comedies, and two surreal (a little something for everyone).

Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

Ticket Info

Tckets on sale at THE SHOP ON THE CORNER in Lunenburg or call Pamela at 527–9094 to reserve.

Please come and invite your friends.

Seating limited so please buy your tickets early.

writing workshop updated: limited to 24 participants

 Download Registration Form

We are hosting a writing workshop in Lunenburg that would be of interest to all Novelists, Screenwriters, Playwrights, Memoirist, and aspiring writers. We are privileged on the South Shore to have an Emmy-nominated writer and former UCLA instructor available to us locally.

Emmy-nominated writer offers 2-day workshop in Lunenburg, NS

Saturday & Sunday, September 29 & 30
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Cost $195

Registration Form Here (Limited to 24 participants)

Workshop Includes: how to choose an idea, three-act structure, scene cards, storyboards, set ups, payoffs, subplots, character development, research, format, dialogue, hiding exposition, buttoning scenes, how to write great openings, great endings, big moments. How to make ‘em laugh and cry. Pitching, query letter, breaking in.  
Writers welcome at every level of experience from novice to pro.

Cynthia Whitcomb has sold more than 70 feature-length screenplays, 30 of which have been filmed, most for prime time television. Her scripts have been nominated for many awards, including the Emmy, Writers Guild of America, Cable Ace, and the Edgar.  She has taught screenwriting for many years, including seven at the acclaimed UCLA Film School.  Many of her students have gone on to great success in Hollywood and made millions of dollars. She has created roles for Jason Robards, Kevin Spacey, Gena Rowlands, Anjelica Huston, Ellen Burstyn, Melanie Griffith, Gabriel Byrne, Sam Elliott, Martin Sheen, Brendan Fraser and many other renowned actors.

Whitcomb has recently returned to her first love, writing for the theatre.  Her play Holidazed, co-authored with Marc Acito, completed a sold out, critically acclaimed six week run at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland, Oregon in 2008 and was revived for another run in 2009.  The Wilde Boy was at Fertile Ground new play festival in 2010.  Lear’s Follies was produced July/August 2012 for the Portland Shakespeare Project. 
She has also written and sold two nonfiction writing books.  Her sister Laura is a successful YA novelist and has also sold two books on novel writing.

Cynthia also takes a group of writers every spring on a Trans-Atlantic cruise.  This April we’ll go to Ireland, France and England.  For more info: cwhitcomb1@aol.com

You will leave inspired and equipped.

DETAILS:
Date:  Saturday & Sunday, September 29 & 30
Cost $195
Location: Lunenburg Arms Conference Room, 94 Pelham St, Lunenburg. www.eden.travel
Parking: across the street
Accommodations: Lunenburg Arms is offering participants a 10% discount on rooms. Call 800-679-4950.
 

What to bring: notebook, pen, and/or computer for taking notes. Lunch or purchase lunch nearby.
General Lunenburg Infohttp://www.lunenburgns.com OR http://www.explorelunenburg.ca

TO REGISTER: Please print the registration form, complete, and mail with check for $195 made payable to Cynthia Whitcomb to Box 404, Lunenburg, NS B0J 2C0. Checks will not be cashed until after the workshop. The check will reserve your seat. Note: we will return your check if you pay with cash at the door.

What to Expect: Cynthia is the writer Pamela and I take the Writing Cruise with each year and after hearing Robert McKee, John Truby, Jeff Kennedy, Syd Field, Robert Olen Butler, Scott Morris, Wendall Thomas, William Goldman, Hallie Ephron, Larry Brooks, Eric Witchey, Aaron Sorkin, Karl Iglesias, Victoria Wisdom, Bill Marsilli, Terry Rossio, Shane Black, Lawrence Kasdan, and Michael Arndt, and many more, Cynthia is our favourite at teaching all the writing tools. 

Please forward this email to anyone you think may be interested or who is a member of a writing group.

Thank you for spreading the word. 

REMEMBER TO REGISTER: please print the registration form, complete, and mail with check for $195 made payable to Cynthia Whitcomb to Box 404, Lunenburg, NS B0J 2C0.

Space is limited, please register quickly.

writing workshop in Lunenburg

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 We are hosting a writing workshop in Lunenburg that would be of interest to all Novelists, Screenwriters, Playwrights, Memoirist, and aspiring writers. I have included the info below and attached a PDF and photograph. This is the writer we take the Writing Cruise with each year and after hearing Robert McKee, John Truby, Jeff Kennedy, Syd Field, Robert Olen Butler, Scott Morris, Wendall Thomas, William Goldman, Hallie Ephron, Larry Brooks, Eric Witchey, Aaron Sorkin, Karl Iglesias, Victoria Wisdom, Bill Marsilli, Terry Rossio, Shane Black, Lawrence Kasdan, and Michael Arndt, and many more, Cynthia is still the best at all the tools. You will leave inspired and equipped. Please pass link anyone you think may be interested or who is a member of a writing group. Thank you for spreading the word. 

Emmy-nominated writer

offers 2-day workshop in Lunenburg

Cynthia Whitcomb’s Writing Workshop

Saturday & Sunday, September 29 & 30

  9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Cost $195

To Register contact Lloyd Williams 

wlw3@mac.com

For Screenwriters, Novelists, Playwrights 

Includes how to choose an idea, three-act structure, scene cards, storyboards, set ups, payoffs, subplots, character development, research, format, dialogue, hiding exposition, buttoning scenes, how to write great openings, great endings, big moments. How to make ‘em laugh and cry. Pitching, query letter, breaking in.  

Writers welcome at every level of experience from novice to pro.

Cynthia Whitcomb has sold more than 70 feature-length screenplays, 30 of which have been filmed, most for prime time television. Her scripts have been nominated for many awards, including the Emmy, Writers Guild of America, Cable Ace, and the Edgar.  She has taught screenwriting for many years, including seven at the acclaimed UCLA Film School.  Many of her students have gone on to great success in Hollywood and made millions of dollars. She has created roles for Jason Robards, Kevin Spacey, Gena Rowlands, Anjelica Huston, Ellen Burstyn, Melanie Griffith, Gabriel Byrne, Sam Elliott, Martin Sheen, Brendan Fraser and many other renowned actors.

Whitcomb has recently returned to her first love, writing for the theatre.  Her play 

Holidazed

, co-authored with Marc Acito, completed a sold out, critically acclaimed six week run at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland, Oregon in 2008 and was revived for another run in 2009.  

The Wilde Boy

 was at Fertile Ground new play festival in 2010.  

Lear’s Follies

 was produced July/August 2012 for the Portland Shakespeare Project. 

She has also written and sold two nonfiction books.  Her sister Laura is a successful YA novelist and has also sold two books on novel writing.

Cynthia also takes a group of writers every spring on a Trans-Atlantic cruise.  This April we’ll go to Ireland, France and England.  For more info: 

cwhitcomb1@aol.com

Story Engineering by Larry Brooks

Story Engineering
By Larry Brooks
The five major elements of story physics are: 1. conceptual power (the compelling essence of the Big Idea)… 2. dramatic tension (conflict)… 3. pacing… 4. hero empathy (resulting in our rooting for something)… and 5. vicarious experience (often a function of setting and concept, as is the case in The Hunger Games).  Those last two combine to become at catch-all that speaks to the need for the reader to be emotionally involved. - Larry Brooks

I met Larry Brooks at the Willamette Writers Conference in Portland, OR. He spoke each of the three mornings on the concepts he calls Story Physics and Story Engineering. Larry looks at writing from both a structured and intuitive approach. In the end he concludes (and I would agree) that both methods are doing the same thing. The structured approach does the design before writing and the intuitive continues to write until the design works. Both end up conforming to the natural laws of story. Unlike other books on story structure,

Story Engineering

clearly explains the interaction of the plot points, plot twists, and milestones. The only chapter I found weak was concerning the Act Three - Resolution. He will have a new book titled The Search for Story coming out later this year to delve deeper into Story Physics, a prequel to Story Engineering. Combined together they are a worthwhile read.

Venice, Italy

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Entering Venice

23 May 2012

The Crown Princess glided into Venice just after noon. The view from our 15th floor balcony gave us a panoramic view of the city and sights. We stepped ashore around 1:00pm and caught a water shuttle to San Marco (St. Mark’s Square).

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San Marco Square

We enjoyed a club sandwich at the Cafe where Byron, Proust, and Dickens frequented, while listening to one of the two orchestras that play all day and into the evening.

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We walked the streets west of the square for couple of hours and ended at he Opera House that was restored after being destroyed by fire several years ago. The restoration is amazing. We stopped at Harry’s Bar for the most expensive cocktails we have ever drank (€14 each). This was Hemingway’s haunt.

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Harry’s Bar

I remember know how much I disliked Campari. We returned by water shuttle to the ship for our late meal with our writing group. The twelve writers averaged 54 pages each during the eleven days, with only four sea days. I finished a third revision of my play. Cynthia compressed her lectures to fit the four days available. She hopes to come to Lunenburg for the It’s Alive Theatre Company’s three nights of short plays on October 11-13. If she comes we will host a writing workshop with her.

Tonight the Venice Chamber Orchestra played on board. We disembark tomorrow morning and will stay over for the next three days to enjoy more of Venice.

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Night Time Gondola View

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Venice you will be missed…

A Few Cruise Photos

[caption id="attachment_5442" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Rotterdam at dock"][/caption][caption id="attachment_5443" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="At sea with our wrap around balcony"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5444" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Writing the Waves Group (Cynthia Whitcomb, our leader in red boa)"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5445" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Pamela in Cork, Ireland"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5447" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Dublin, Ireland street scene"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5448" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Dublin guitarist with home-made electric guitar and amp"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5449" align="alignnone" width="334" caption="Found a pub in Dublin, wonder how?"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5450" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="London and Big Ben"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5451" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Traffic jam on the Thames River in London"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5452" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Found a theatre bookstore and another pub."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5454" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Bayeux, France"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5455" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Bayeux, France museum"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5456" align="alignnone" width="375" caption="Bayeux, France Cathedral"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5457" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Brugge, Belguim, out favorite medieval town"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5458" align="alignnone" width="375" caption="The famous Brugge canals"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5459" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Market Day in Brugge"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5460" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Spires everywhere"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5461" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Canal repose, Brugge."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5462" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Brugge is a historic swan sanctuary."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5464" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="The painted houses of Brugge reminded me of home in Lunenburg."][/caption]

Rotterdam, The Netherlands [caption id="attachment_5466" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Rotterdam a city of diminishing canals"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5467" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Our patio H2otel room beside the canal"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5468" align="alignnone" width="375" caption="Boats seem to outnumber cars in Rotterdam"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5469" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Rotterdam, a modern city rebuilt after WWII"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5470" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Modern suspension bridge in Rotterdam"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5471" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Canal side cafes in old town Rotterdam"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5472" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Captain Pamela at the wheel in Rotterdam"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_5473" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="A few of the classic sail boats and barges"][/caption]

Lloyd wins SCWC Keyword-Themed Story Contest

For the past three days we attended the Southern California Writers' Conference in San Diego. Over two hundred and fifty writers from around the world attended. A group from Australia flew in early to attend, a woman from Columbia, several from England and Europe also attended. The rest came from Canada and the States.

The speakers included best-selling writers, award winning screenwriters, agents, and editors. We enjoyed the talks by Warren Fahy (Fragment), Mike Sirota (Fire Dance), Derek Haas (3:10 to Yuma and Wanted, Eric DeLabarre (Saltwater Taffy, a great new YA novel), Eric Bork (From Earth to the Moon and Band of Brothers), Lisa Fugard (Skinner's Drift), Michelle Scott (several mystery series), and Alexandra Sokoloff (The Harrowing, The Price, The Unseen, The Hidden).

Mark Clements (6:02, Children of the End, and Lorelei) led three outstanding Read & Critique sessions each evening that continued late into the morning.

Overall we were disappointed that the level of the conference was very basic, though we can always learn from someone and we both left with a few gems. We met many wonderful people excited about writing and passionate about the future of digital publishing. Conferences always inspire and we look forward to spending the next several weeks holed up and working on our respective projects.

The conference hosted a Keyword-Themed Story Contest. I entered and was surprised when they started reading my story from the lectern. Pamela was wonderful as always and edited all my grammatical and spelling errors late the night before the deadline. I always incorporate her suggestions, so I share the win with her. -L

Scrivener: A Writing Environment

Buy Scrivener 2.0 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence) I have used Scrivener since its original beta for all my writing, because it is not a word processor, but a complete writing environment. All the tools I need are at my fingertips. All research, notes, outlines, sketches, drafts, ideas, photos, and writing tools like dictionary and thesaurus are now open on my desktop.

Buy Scrivener 2.0 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence)

I have tried every writing program available and none compares to the simplicity and power of Scrivener. Keith Latte, the developer has created a uniquely user definable workspace that each writer can define to meet your own needs. Whether you write intuitively, visually, outline, or need extensive research, all are accommodated in Scrivener.

Buy Scrivener 2.0 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence)

A Windows version is currently in beta testing. If you are a Mac user I know no better way to organize and fulfill all your writing needs.

Click here for a 30 day free trial of Scrivener. Click here for a 30 day free trial of Scrivener.

Navigator of the Seas

April 10, 2010 A 14-night, Transatlantic cruise to Europe, a working cruise with plenty of play time, an experience of a lifetime that we hope to repeat next year... We want to share our experience with you and hope you enjoy the posts.

We left a grey day at Ports of Miami ...

... for the big open blue. Here's the view from stateroom 7274:

Nine "at sea" days. If you think that might be boring ... the ocean is vast and ever-changing. It amazes me. It's hard to realize how big it really is until it's all you see for seven straight days and again for two days more. Amazing...

We had a calm sea the entire time and just enough beam sea to gently rock us to sleep at night.

Inside stateroom 7274:

And outside. My half of the balcony. ;) I loooved the balcony.

Sixteen writers spent most waking hours in the Boardroom on Level 2, just above the waterline.

Every "at sea" day went like this:

9am-Noon - Writing workshop with Cynthia Whitcomb

Lunch

1:00-5:00    -  Write on own (no talking), technically 2-5pm, but we needed every spare minute

5:05-5:20    -  Scramble to get ready for dinner

5:30-7:30    -  Lovely, amusing, inspiring dinners with our group and a little shop talk

7:30-8:00    -  Dress down, cram, grab a tea

8:00-10:00  - Writing salon: readings, critiques, problem solving

10:00-           -  Cocktails at the Champagne Bar, sometimes a brainstorm/problem solving session

?                      -  Fall into bed and lose another hour to the time zone monster

Repeat.

We made it to the gym the first five mornings, but after losing an hour at night, seven (AGH!) times, we cared less about gaining elsewhere. Our room attendant, Al, a giant in size and energy who was always, "As cool as a piña colada," or "As cool as the ocean breeze," said, "You're going to need a vacation after your vacation."

Pictured (L to R): Lloyd, Beryl, Richard, Joan, Joanie, Penny, and Jackie.

***NEWSFLASH*** I met Lloyd seven years ago and this was the first time I saw him wear a necktie. Doesn't he look dapper in his tie? I better send a pic to our Moms ...

One of three formal nights at Swan Lake Dining Room:

Pictured (L to R): Billy, Lorraine, Maryka, Molly, Chris, Cynthia, Jessie, Bernadette and Lloyd #2.

We were on our own for lunches and enjoyed the gourmet salad bar at Nutcracker restaurant, otherwise we preferred the speed of Windjammer, a huge buffet open for every meal. I especially enjoyed the ethnic dishes. Overall, the food was very good, the desserts were good enough to double up on after dinner, and the coffee was strong enough to fuel a Prevost.

We had little time to explore the ship, but here are a couple views:

The casino:

We have a lot more to share with you. Stay tuned!

Love,

-P

P.S. - You can sign up for automatic updates by clicking the orange icon at the top.

P.P.S. - We love to hear from you so feel free to comment!

Bon Voyage... Writing the Waves

April 10, 2010 - Atlantic Ocean We leave today for a Trans-Atlantic cruise aboard the Navigator of the Seas on a voyage to the Canary Islands, Barcelona, Nice, Florence, and Rome.

While at sea we will participate in Cynthia Whitcomb's screenwriting workshop. We have seen Cynthia before at the Screenwriting Expo in LA and the Screenwriting Conference in Santa Fe.

We have rented an apartment in Rome and look forward to several days of touring this grand city with our friend and artist, Dennis Cigler. Dennis heads the art department at one of Rome's most prestigious schools. In his spare time he guides couples on exclusive private tours of the city, in the style of the Grand Tours of the nineteenth century.

We look forward to visiting so many great places and hope to capture some great images and more stories. -L

Writing Workshop

[caption id="attachment_4383" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Lloyd reading at The Secret Spot following writer\'s workshop"][/caption] March 20,2010 - Key West, FL While in Key West I decided to participate in a writer's workshop sponsored by The Studios of Key West. We had two great instructors Hallie Ephron, sister of Nora Ephron, the writer of many great screenplays like When Harry Meet Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, Julie and Julia, and You've Got Mail. Hallie is book reviewer for the Boston Globe and successful novelist. Our other instructor was Roberta Isleib, a writer with several successful mystery series and President of Sisters in Crime and chairs the selection committee for the Edgar Award.

We had a small group of fiction and memoir writers that critiqued each others works. At the end of the two day workshop we met at The Secret Spot a local night club and had a series of reading over cocktails. -L